Measuring Pasture Dry Matter Intake of Horses


Why Is It Important to Accurately Measure Horse Dry Matter Intake?*

The ability to predict a horse’s rate of pasture dry matter intake (DMI) assists horse owners/managers in accounting for pasture’s contribution toward a horse’s daily nutrient requirements. Accounting for nutrients obtained from pasture improves the ability to accurately balance rations thereby preventing inefficiencies associated with over- or under- feeding nutrients.…

Effect of Grazing Cell Size on Horse Pasture Utilization


Purpose *

Horses grazing continuously within a single pasture often graze selectively resulting in under- and over-grazed areas. The net result is inefficient use of forage and/or eventually loss of ground cover. This practice contributes negatively to pasture health and the environment. Rotational grazing can alleviate this problem by forcing horses to be less selective due to constraints on space and time allowed for grazing.…

Rotational Grazing Effects on Pasture Nutrient Content


Why Look at Rotations Grazing in Horse Pastures?

Rotational grazing is a recommended strategy to improve pasture health and animal performance. Previous studies have reported improved forage quality in rotationally grazed pastures compared to those continuously grazed by cattle, but data are limited for horse pastures.…

An NE-1441 Project: Proposed Methodologies for Administering a Multi-State Environmental Best Management Practices Survey of Equine Properties


*Purpose 

Several states have reported that equine are the fastest growing segment of the livestock industry. Nationwide, equine has increased by 77% since 1997; and it is reported there are approximately 9.5 million horses in the United States (AHC, 2005). Proper management of equine operations requires the adoption of Best Management Practices (BMPs) to balance nutrient production and prevent erosion.…

Case Study of Contaminated Compost: Collaborations Between Vermont Extension and the Agency of Agriculture to Mitigate Damage Due to Persistent Herbicide Residues

Why Study Herbicide Contamination of Compost?

Picloram, clopyralid, aminopyralid and aminocyclopyrochlor are broadleaf herbicides commonly used in pastures due to effectiveness in controlling undesirable plants and the very low toxicity for animals and fish. In fact, some of these herbicides do not require animal removal post application.…

Quantification of Sodium Pentobarbital Residues from Equine Mortality Compost Piles

Waste to Worth: Spreading science and solutions logoWaste to Worth home | More proceedings….

*Abstract

Preliminary research has shown that sodium pentobarbital, a euthanasia drug, can persist up to 180 days in equine mortality compost piles. This experiment attempts to expand upon past research by quantifying pentobarbital residues in equine mortality compost piles over a longer duration using innovative sampling schemes.…