Antimicrobial Resistance Resource Library

Antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) infections are a serious threat to global public health. Each year AMR accounts for roughly 700,000 deaths worldwide. While AMR-related research is ongoing, conveying research-based knowledge about AMR mechanisms, risks, and opportunities to improve outcomes to the general public, agricultural producers, food safety experts, educators, and consumers is imperative.

The iAMResponsible Project team, a nationwide extension effort for addressing AMR, has developed a shared resource library to curate and translate the latest news and research findings on AMR for a non-technical audience. This library is designed to provide educators and advisors with access to resources that will assist you in your discussion of antimicrobial resistance.  Please feel free to share and re-purpose educational products in this library with local audiences.

How to find materials

For those seeking specific resources, materials are organized type of media. However, the library can be sorted by any of the other fields included in each entry, including topics using the sort function, found in the top-left area of the library window. Additionally,  there is a search button in the top right corner of the insert that looks like a magnifying glass which will allow the user to search for specific keywords. Use the view larger version option in the lower right of the library window to expand to a full-screen view.

Is something missing from our library?

We welcome your suggestions for resources that you have found beneficial in your educational or advisory role.  Please email the project team at iamr.educate@gmail.com to let us know what additional topics or types of resources would be most valuable to you in discussing AMR.

Authors/Sponsors

The iAMResponsible project was started by Amy Schmidt at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Stephanie Lansing at the University of Maryland. Find out more about the project here. This product was funded by financial assistance from USDA-NIFA.